Retirement

What Happens? 

We’ve been asked a few questions regarding what happens to those portions of your estate that aren’t treated consistently with what you say in your will.  Many people assume wills and trusts are the pillars of a perfect estate plan. However, asset titling–the way you own an asset–is just as critical. Conflict instructions can create

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The Busyness of Life

What does retirement really, truly mean? What are your plans for after you retire? We’ve been thinking about this recently. Many would define it as “retreating from the ‘busyness’ of life.”  When do you plan on retiring? How old will you be? How long do you think you’ll spend in retirement? Getting away from all

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Seven Different Ways

We thought we’d bring to your attention an article recently published by AARP that discusses seven different ways retirement income will be different this year:  “For most people, retirement finance is a delicate balance between income that’s likely less than what you made while working and expenses that may be lower in some areas (no

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New Law For 2024

If you own a small business or family office you could be required to report ownership details to the federal government… or face stiff penalties and possible jail time. The Corporate Transparency Act went into effect on January 1, 2024, and it requires otherwise unregulated companies to report information about “beneficial” owners, those who own

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Estate Planning

We all know that complex estates require sophisticated estate planning. If you have a large estate or own a business, only a qualified estate-planning attorney will have the knowledge and expertise to tailor to your specific needs.  Because we have been doing business with you, we may be able to help answer some of the

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Gifts That Keep Giving

The younger a child is when you contribute to their 529 plan, the longer the account has to potentially benefit from compound growth. In 2023, individuals can contribute up to $17,000 per year (and couples up to $34,000 per year) without eating into their lifetime gift and estate tax exemption.  For older kids or grandchildren,

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